Swatting at bugs in your car raises the risk of an accident

This summer brought the emergence of the notorious 17-year cicadas to the Northeast states. But you don’t have to wait 17 years to be annoyed by most types of cicadas, as they usually emerge each summer to lull us to sleep on summer nights with their mating calls.

Of course, that is not all that these and other large, fly insects can do. When they interact with people who are driving by dive-bombing their heads and faces, they can be a real danger on the roads. 

Bugs in the car are a dangerous distraction

You don’t have to be fearful of bugs to find a buzzing insect zipping around inside of your vehicle quite distracting. If they are armed with a stinger, like bees, wasps and hornets, drivers may swat at them frantically as they try to avoid getting stung. When all this is happening while you are driving at speeds of 70 mph, the crash risk to you and those around you is greatly enhanced.

Avoiding the risk is your best option

Obviously, an open car window presents a perfect opportunity for an insect to hitch a ride with you to its destination. However, as most drivers are unwilling to pick up these flying hitchhikers, the best defense is to drive with the AC on and the windows tightly rolled up.

However, if you were injured by a distracted driver, regardless of the reason for the distraction, you have the right to file a claim for damages for your injuries and other losses. An experienced advocate can help you better understand the next steps in the process. 

Archives