Can you work with a specialist after a job injury?

When you injure yourself on the job in New York, you’ll need medical attention to make a full recovery. Some people only need a few treatments before they’re ready to get back to work. However, you might need specialized treatment if you’re suffering from a severe injury.

Could the doctor refer you to a specialist?

To start, the insurance company might refer you to an occupational therapy clinic. This clinic might offer tests, scans and treatments while you collect workers’ compensation benefits. If you suffered from a minor or moderate injury, this might be all you need to get back to the workforce. However, you might need more intensive treatment if you suffered from a severe injury.

Fortunately, the clinic could refer you to a specialist that deals with your specific condition. You might want to request a specialist if you feel like occupational therapy isn’t enough. The specialist might examine your condition and order more tests, treatments and even surgery. If your injuries are serious enough, the insurance company might skip occupational therapy altogether and refer you directly to a specialist.

During this time, your employer might want to see your medical records and paperwork so they can stay on top of the situation. The insurance company might also want to see your medical records. With this information, they could determine how long you will receive benefits. They might also ask your specialist when you can return to work.

Generally, HIPPA laws prevent people from viewing your medical records without your consent. However, HIPPA doesn’t apply to workers’ compensation insurance companies. They can view your medical records without your permission as well as your employer.

What should you do if you suffer from a workplace injury?

When you injure yourself in the workplace, report the incident to your supervisor as soon as possible. Afterward, you might want to talk to an attorney to ensure that you don’t make any missteps during the process.

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